All posts tagged: Vancouver

Boho Boutique: Folk Art Interiors, Vancouver BC

This weekend was filled with firsts. For a person who has lived in Vancouver for four-and-a-half years, there are a remarkable number of things I haven’t done, places I haven’t been. On Saturday I went snowshoeing on Grouse Mountain and today I bopped on over to Spanish Banks for an easy-like-Sunday-morning walk. And what’s a basic betch going for walk without a coffee in hand? Queue another first: Grounds for Coffee – and their famous cinnamon buns. I didn’t even stop to take a picture before inhaling my sticky little bun. (Thanks for turning me onto Grounds, Jenn Lee!) Floating on a cozy sugar high, I am walking back to the Jeep when what to my wondering eyes should appear, but a shop crowned with vintage antlers? With vibes like that, how could I not? And of course, what should I find but a dust-laden, rolled-up, hairy, disheveled carpet. I couldn’t have found that thing faster if it had been calling me by name. I didn’t stand a chance. So I just spent the last hour-and-a-half beating …

The Snowshoe Grind Isn’t the Hell-Hath-Frozen-Over Workout It Sounds Like

I had seen the Snowshoe Grind advertised on Grouse Mountain’s website. My immediate reaction was, “As if hiking the Grouse Grind isn’t torture enough.” Now, factor in the awkwardness of snowshoes. Sounds. Awful. Well, I’m here to debunk the Snowshoe Grind myth because my gal pal and I unintentionally did the damn thing last Saturday. And I was wrong. It isn’t the hell-hath-frozen-over workout it sounds like. It was awesome and it made me so grateful to live in Vancouver. First, the Snowshoe Grind is completely independent of the Grouse Grind. The trailhead starts atop the gondola, near the ice rink. Second, where the Grouse Grind is a 2.9 km, one-way trail, the Snowshoe Grind is 4.3 kilometres out-and-back. It starts as a groomed path, which keeps up for maybe a quarter of the way. Walking this bit, you’ll wonder whether you should have bothered with snowshoes at all. Soon enough, the trail narrows and leads grinders uphill through a pretty forest. Snow falls from overburdened tree boughs. The sunshine illuminates the diamond dust that blankets …

Where Can I Buy a Fiddle Leaf Fig Tree in Vancouver, BC?

I’ve done it! I’ve finally found a fiddle leaf fig tree in Vancouver. After drooling about them on Instagram, Greg and I now have our very own. Take a look: Isn’t she a beaut? We happen to be Survivor fans and this season there’s a contestant named Figgy, so naturally we’ve nicknamed her as much. We bought our tree at Maple Leaf Garden Centre in Lynn Valley, North Vancouver. The last few times I’ve stopped in they’ve had one or two on hand. This visit, they had one fiddle leaf fig tree (which we bought) and one fiddle leaf fig bush. If you don’t live on the North Shore, it might be worth giving them a call in advance. Address: 1343 Lynn Valley Road, North Vancouver Telephone: 604-985-1784 Hours: Monday-Saturday 9 a.m. – 5:30 p.m.; Sunday and Holidays 9 a.m. – 5 p.m. According to their website, there is a Maple Leaf Garden Centre in West Vancouver too. I’d wager a bet that they also carry fiddle leaf fig trees. Address: 2558 Haywood Avenue, West …

Hiking to Eagle Bluffs Viewpoint in Cypress Provincial Park, B.C.

Location: Cypress Provincial Park Park here: 6000 Cypress Bowl Road, Vancouver Hike Distance: 8-9 kilometres (round trip) Hike Duration: 3-4 hours (10:30 start/2:30 finish, 20-30 minutes at Eagle Bluffs) Difficulty: Intermediate What makes it intermediate? A 1.8 km uphill start Park website: env.gov.bc.ca/bcparks/cypress Eagle Bluffs has become a very popular hike because the viewpoint offers unobstructed views of Vancouver, Georgia Straight, West Vancouver, Howe Sound, Bowen Island and Gibsons. I’ve been meaning to hike Eagle Bluffs for some time now, but when I first attempted it April 30th the trail was still too snowed in for my runners. I ditched and headed for Dog Mountain in Mount Seymour Provincial Park. Today of course, was a bright blue August Day. Only thing was, I didn’t have anyone to go with. Then I thought about the hundreds (thousands?) of people who would be hiking to Eagle Bluffs. So off I went. Finding the Trailhead After exiting Highway 1 to Cypress Provincial Park, drive until the road ends at Cypress Ski Area. Along the way you’ll surely see cyclists making the …